Project

Performance Characterization of Beams with High-Strength Reinforcement

Research purpose

The proposed study will explore critical material and structural behaviors at the boundaries of high-strength steel properties that can currently be achieved. Key steel properties that will be explored are: 1) the tensile-to-yield strength ratio (T/Y ratio), 2) the ultimate or uniform elongation, su, and 3) the low-cycle fatigue performance relevant to seismic applications. Material and structural tests on concrete columns are proposed to be conducted by Wassim Ghannoum, University of Texas, Austin, and are not funded as part of this proposal. This proposal (UC Berkeley) is to conduct tests of beams, and to determine how beam rotation capacity is affected by material properties. The tests will provide much needed experimental evidence to define structurally acceptable properties for steel mills to target in production and the research community to use in structural testing. In addition, this proposal will also carry out limited analytical studies of archetype buildings to establish seismic demands for beams and columns; and additional analytical studies to develop models for plastic-rotation capacity of beams and to extract implications for non-seismic designs.

Grantee
University of California at Berkeley
Project Area
Structural Engineering
CPF research grant #
04-14
Award amount
$418,869
Grant period
Aug 2014 - Oct 2016
Grant Status
In Progress
Principal Investigator
Jack P. Moehle, Ph.D.
Industry champions

Dominic Kelly – SGH
Andrew Taylor – KPFF
Loring Wyllie – Degenkolb

CPF allies
Research deliverables
  1. Interim report documenting the design and construction of the first set of test beams.
  2. Interim report documenting the status of the tests including preliminary test results.
  3. Interim report documenting final test results and status of analytical studies.
  4. Interim report documenting the status and preliminary results of the analytical studies.
  5. Submit final report(s) suitable for publication by University of California, Berkeley and for reference by Pankow Foundation.